The Caribbean: A Clean Energy Revolution on the Front Lines of Climate Change

Clean energy technologies are making headway throughout the Caribbean — and the U.S. should take note.

By Richard SchiffmanForeign Policy In Focus

 

Burdened by high energy costs and situated on the front lines of a changing climate, Caribbean countries are on the verge of a sustainable energy revolution. (Photo: World Environment Day in Barbados)

Burdened by high energy costs and situated on the front lines of a changing climate, Caribbean countries are on the verge of a sustainable energy revolution. (Photo: World Environment Day in Barbados)

Lefties Food Stall, a pint-sized eatery serving Barbados’ signature flying-fish sandwiches, recently became the first snack shack on the Caribbean island to be fitted with a solar panel. The nearby public shower facility sports a panel as well. So does the bus shelter across the street, the local police station, and scores of gaily colored houses on the coastal road leading into the capital, Bridgetown.

Like many other small island nations, Barbados has to ship in all of the oil that it uses to produce electricity—making power over four times more costly than it is in the fuel-rich United States.

That high price has proven to be a boon for Barbados’ fledgling solar industry. Nearly half of all homes boast solar water heaters on their roofs, which pay for themselves in lower electric bills in less than two years. Increasingly, industries like the island’s small desalination plant are installing solar arrays to meet a portion of their power needs.

This move to solar is being driven by tax incentives for green businesses and consumers. In an address marking the United Nations Environment Program’s (UNEP) “World Environment Day” in Bridgetown’s Independence Square, Barbados Prime Minister Freundel Stuart recently pledged that the island nation would produce 29 percent of its energy from renewables by the end of the next decade.

That rather conservative goal is still over twice what the United States currently produces with renewables. It won’t be hard to reach. Not only is the island blessed with abundant sunshine, it also has year-round trade winds to run wind turbines, and sugar cane waste—or bagasse—that can be used as a biofuel. The Barbados government is furthermore looking into harnessing the energy of the tides, as well as introducing ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), a technology that employs the temperature difference between cooler deep and warmer shallow sea waters to generate electricity.

Clean energy technologies are slowly making headway throughout the Caribbean. And the nearby United States, the world’s number-one historical emitter of carbon emissions, should pay attention.

A Frontline Region

Barbados is not alone in the Caribbean in its enthusiasm for green technology.

Aruba is planning a 3.5-MW solar airport, perhaps the largest such project in the world. The Dutch-speaking island has combined wind and solar power with energy efficiency measures to cut its imports of heavy fuel oil in half, saving some $50 million a year.

The volcanic islands of Nevis, Montserrat, and St. Vincent have contracted with Icelandic geothermal companies to conduct exploratory projects to determine how to tap their vast geothermal potential. Meanwhile, mountainous Dominica already meets about half of its energy demand with hydropower.

Caribbean islands don’t just have abundant resources for developing clean energy. They also have compelling reasons to do so. The region is burdened by some of the highest energy costs in the world, which have stunted its industrial development and drained its reserves of foreign exchange. The islands also have fragile ecosystems like mangrove forests and coral reefs, which are highly vulnerable to oil spills and pollution. And many countries like Barbados depend on tourists, who will flock there only so long as the places remain attractively clean and green.

But the best reason to cut carbon emissions is the danger that these island nations face if climate change proceeds unchecked. And indeed, climate change is already having a big impact. In recent years, lower rainfall in the Eastern Caribbean has posed a threat to agriculture and scarce groundwater supplies. Sea level rise as well as ocean acidification and warming have killed many protective coral reefs, leading to severe beach erosion. And the hurricane-prone region is being battered by increasingly frequent and powerful storms.

At the World Environment Day event in Bridgetown, the prime minister of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Ralph Gonsalves, called climate change “the most serious existential threat in the world today.”

That is certainly true for St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Successive storms ripped through the islands in 2010, 2011, and 2012, leading to a yearly loss of up to 17 percent of the developing country’s GDP, as well as destroying hundreds of homes and killing dozens of islanders. “If my people don’t get flooded out on the coast,” the prime minister observed ruefully, “they will be washed away in landslides.”

Barbados’ prime minister, Freundel Stuart, echoed his counterpart’s sense of urgency. “Since the issue involves our very survival,” Stuart told the crowd, “capitulation is not an option.” Stuart said he believes that the Caribbean should set “a shining example” for the world to follow. His government recently commissioned a Green Economy Scoping Study, prepared in partnership with UNEP and released in Bridgetown in June, which includes recommendations on how to make the island’s agriculture, fisheries, transportation, and energy systems more sustainable.

It makes sense: these islands are on the front line for climate change’s destructive forces, so they should also be on the front line in cutting their own carbon emissions. They need to demonstrate how seriously they take the threat, as an example to the rest of us.

A Marshall Plan for the Caribbean

Right now, energy production in the Caribbean is anything but sustainable. Venezuela’s late socialist president Hugo Chavez offered many islands long-term loans and concessionary rates for cheaper oil. His successor has done his best to maintain the modest subsidies.

But nobody can say how long this largesse will last, given Venezuela’s current financial crisis, and still less what will happen to already stressed island economies when they are forced to pay full price for crude.

The Caribbean needs to become energy-independent in order to thrive. But overhauling energy infrastructure does not come cheaply. There are knotty technical challenges related to the stability of the grid that few small nations are currently equipped to meet. And the small scale of the demand for electricity on many of the islands makes it hard to attract international investors.

Moreover, countries like Jamaica, St. Kitts-Nevis, Grenada, Barbados, and Antigua and Barbuda are saddled with public debts that often exceed their annual GDP. So unlike an industrial powerhouse like Germany, for example, few Caribbean nations are in a position to fully exploit their renewable energy potential.

The big industrial powers that are responsible for the problems of island nations should be lending a helping hand to the folks suffering the most from climate change. Loans from international development banks, as well as technology transfers and training from wealthier countries, would go a long way. International development banks also need to prime the pump with programs to encourage prudent investment.

This isn’t charity. By helping islands that are geographically close to the United States go green, Washington won’t just be cutting harmful greenhouse gases for everyone. It will also create opportunities to learn valuable lessons in overcoming technical challenges—about how, for example, to successfully integrate intermittent inputs from wind and solar into the power grid, a problem that has limited the United States’ own adoption of renewables.

The vulnerable islands of the Caribbean are a perfect laboratory to test solutions on a small scale that can eventually be applied to the far more complex U.S. energy infrastructure.

After World War II, America lent its economic muscle to help rebuild Europe’s shattered economies through the Marshall Plan. It is time to have a Marshall Plan for clean energy— not to rebuild war-torn nations, but to help protect our abused climate system from further damage. The Caribbean, blessed with a wealth of sun, wind, and geothermal energy, is a great place to start.

Richard Schiffman is an environmental writer. He recently traveled to Barbados to attend the World Environment Day celebrations.

Publicado em Aquecimento global, Cambio climático, Carbono, Cidades Sustentáveis, Clima, Climate Change, Comunidades, Consciência ambiental, Consumo, Desenvolvimento sustentável, Economia, Economia Verde-Green Economy, Empresas, Energia, Energia eólica, Energia solar, Energias renováveis, Environmental journalism, Environmental researchs, Gestão sustentável, Jornalismo Ambiental, Mecanismos de Desenvolvimento Limpo-MDL, Mudança climática, Potencial econômico, Programas ambientais, Projetos ambientais, Sustainable Cities, Sustentabilidade, Tecnologia ambiental | Marcado com , , , , , , , , | Deixe um comentário

Una revolución de energía limpia contra el cambio climático

Esta columna revisa los pasos que están dando algunos países insulares del Caribe a favor de las energías limpias, como parte de su lucha contra el cambio climático.

Por Richard Schiffman

IPS – Inter Press Service

 

Niños y niñas aprenden sobre energía solar durante una exhibición en Georgetown, Guyana. Crédito: cortesía de CREDP.

Niños y niñas aprenden sobre energía solar durante una exhibición en Georgetown, Guyana. Crédito: cortesía de CREDP.

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, 21 jul 2014 (IPS) – El pequeño comedor Lefties Food Stall, en Barbados, que ofrece los emblemáticos sándwiches de pez volador, es el primer local de venta de comida que en esta isla del Caribe cuenta con un panel solar.

Cerca de allí, las duchas públicas también instalaron uno, y lo mismo hizo un refugio de autobuses que queda cruzando la calle, la comisaría local y las numerosas casas coloridas en la avenida costera que lleva a la capital, Bridgetown.

Como muchas otras pequeñas naciones insulares, Barbados debe importar todo el petróleo que usa para producir electricidad. Esto la vuelve cuatro veces más cara que en Estados Unidos, un país rico en combustible.

El elevado costo de la electricidad se convirtió en una oportunidad para la naciente industria solar de Barbados. Casi la mitad de las viviendas tienen calentadores solares de agua en sus techos, lo que termina siendo redituable porque la factura del servicio termina bajando en menos de dos años. Cada vez más, sectores como la pequeña planta de desalinización, instalan dispositivos solares para cubrir una parte de sus necesidades energéticas.

La energía solar avanza gracias a incentivos impositivos para consumidores y empresarios verdes. En junio, el primer ministro de Barbados, Freundel Stuart, prometió que este país produciría 29 por ciento de su energía a partir de fuentes renovables para fines de la próxima década.

Es un objetivo más bien conservador, pero aun así es el doble de lo que Estados Unidos produce con fuentes renovables. No será difícil de alcanzar, pues no solo la isla goza de abundante sol, sino que tiene vientos capaces de mover turbinas eólicas todo el año y residuos de caña de azúcar, o bagazo, que sirven para producir biocombustible.

El gobierno de Barbados, además, busca aprovechar la energía de las mareas, así como introducir la conversión de la energía térmica del océano, una tecnología que emplea la diferencia de temperatura entre las corrientes profundas más frías y las superficiales más cálidas para generar electricidad.

 

“Es hora de tener un Plan Marshall para la energía limpia, no reconstruir naciones destruidas por la guerra, sino ayudar a proteger nuestro asediado sistema climático de más daños.”

Las tecnologías de energía limpia avanzan poco a poco en el Caribe, y el vecino Estados Unidos, el principal emisor de gases contaminantes de la historia, debería prestar atención.

Región de avanzada

Aruba planifica construir un aeropuerto a base de energía solar de 3,5 megavatios, quizá el mayor proyecto de este tipo en el mundo. La isla, de habla holandesa, combinó la energía eólica y la solar con medidas para mejorar la eficiencia y logró bajar las importaciones de crudo ahorrándose unos 50 millones de dólares al año.

Las islas volcánicas de Nieves, Montserrat y San Vicente contrataron empresas geotérmicas islandesas para realizar proyectos exploratorios y determinar cómo aprovechar sus vastas reservas. Por su parte, la montañosa Dominica cubre alrededor de la mitad de su demanda con la energía hidráulica.

Las naciones insulares del Caribe no solo tienen abundantes recursos para desarrollar las energías limpias, sino que tienen razones de peso para hacerlo. La región es una de las que más paga en el mundo por el consumo de energía, lo que perjudicó su desarrollo industrial y agotó sus reservas de divisas.

La isla también tiene ecosistemas frágiles como manglares y arrecifes de coral, que son muy vulnerables a los derrames de petróleo y a la contaminación. Y muchos países como Barbados dependen de los turistas, quienes solo acuden en tropel si los lugares permanecen limpios y verdes.

Pero la mayor razón para reducir las emisiones de carbono es el peligro que supone para estas naciones insulares que no se tomen medidas contra el cambio climático. Y, de hecho, este fenómeno ya tiene un gran impacto. En los últimos años, las lluvias en la zona oriental del Caribe supusieron una amenaza para la agricultura y los escasos suministros de agua subterránea.

El nivel del mar aumenta, al igual que la acidification del océano, y el recalientamiento mató a los arrecifes de coral protectores, lo que causó la erosión costera. Además, esta región propensa a huracanes sufre sus embates cada vez con más frecuencia y más fuerza.

En San Vicente y las Granadinas, sucesivas tormentas arrasaron las islas en 2010, 2011 y 2012, lo que llevó a una pérdida anual de 17 por ciento del producto interno bruto (PIB ) de ese país en desarrollo, así como destruyó cientos de viviendas y dejó decenas de personas muertas.

El gobierno de Barbados encargó un estudio de análisis de la economía verde, preparado junto con el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Medio Ambiente y divulgado en Bridgetown en junio, que incluye recomendaciones sobre cómo lograr que la agricultura, la pesca, el transporte y la energía sean más sostenibles.

Un plan Marshall para el Caribe

Actualmente, la producción de energía en el Caribe es cualquier cosa menos sostenible. El fallecido presidente socialista de Venezuela, Hugo Chavez, ofreció a muchas de las islas de esta región préstamos a largo plazo y concesiones para obtener crudo barato. Y su sucesor ha hecho lo posible por mantener los modestos subsidios.

Pero nadie sabe cuánto durará esa generosidad dada la actual crisis económica que atraviesa Venezuela, y menos qué pasará con las economías insulares, ya exigidas, cuando tengan que pagar por el precio total del crudo.

El Caribe necesita lograr la independencia energética para crecer. Pero la infraestructura no es barata. Hay dificultades técnicas relacionadas con la estabilidad del tendido eléctrico que pocas naciones pequeñas pueden resolver. Además, la poca demanda de electricidad en estas islas no ayuda a captar inversores internacionales.

Además, países como Jamaica, San Cristóbal y Nieves, Granada, Barbados y Antigua y Barbuda cargan con deudas públicas que suelen exceder sus respectivos PIB anuales.

Las grandes potencias industriales, que son responsables de estos problemas de las naciones insulares, deberían dar una mano a quienes sufren más a causa del cambio climático. Los préstamos de los bancos de desarrollo internacional, así como la transferencia de tecnología y la capacitación de los países más ricos, servirían mucho.

Con su ayuda a que estas islas, geográficamente cerca de Estados Unidos, se vuelvan verdes, Washington no solo logrará reducir los gases invernadero para todos, sino que también creará oportunidades para aprender lecciones valiosas sobre cómo superar los varios desafíos técnicos que aparecen.

Las vulnerables islas del Caribe son un laboratorio perfecto para probar soluciones a pequeña escala que pueden llegar a servir para una infraestructura mucho más compleja como la de Estados Unidos.

Después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial (1939-1945), Estados Unidos usó su poderío económico para ayudar a reconstruir las destruidas economías de Europa mediante el Plan Marshall. Es hora de tener un Plan Marshall para la energía limpia, no reconstruir naciones destruidas por la guerra, sino ayudar a proteger nuestro asediado sistema climático.

El Caribe, bendecido con mucho sol, viento y energía geotérmica, es un buen lugar para comenzar.

Richard Schiffman se especializa en ambiente, que visitó Barbados en junio. Este artículo fue originalmente publicado por Foreign Policy in Focus.

Publicado em Aquecimento global, Cambio climático, Carbono, Cidades Sustentáveis, Clima, Climate Change, Comunidades, Consciência ambiental, Consumo, Desenvolvimento sustentável, Economia, Economia Verde-Green Economy, Empresas, Energia, Energia eólica, Energia solar, Energias renováveis, Environmental journalism, Environmental researchs, Gestão sustentável, Jornalismo Ambiental, Mecanismos de Desenvolvimento Limpo-MDL, Mudança climática, Potencial econômico, Sustainable Cities, Sustentabilidade, Tecnologia ambiental | Marcado com , , , , , , , , | Deixe um comentário

United Nations World Urbanization Prospects, The 2014 Revision: Highlights

United Nations World Urbanization Prospects, The 2014 Revision: Highlights

World Urbanization Trends 2014: Key Facts

• Globally, more people live in urban areas than in rural areas, with 54 per cent of the world’s population residing in urban areas in 2014. In 1950, 30 per cent of the world’s population was urban, and by 2050, 66 per cent of the world’s population is projected to be urban.

• Today, the most urbanized regions include Northern America (82 per cent living in urban areas in 2014), Latin America and the Caribbean (80 per cent), and Europe (73 per cent). In contrast, Africa and Asia remain mostly rural, with 40 and 48 per cent of their respective populations living in urban areas. All regions are expected to urbanize urther over the coming decades. Africa and Asia are urbanizing faster than the other regions and are projected to become 56 and 64 per cent urban, respectively, by 2050.

• The rural population of the world has grown slowly since 1950 and is expected to reach its peak in a few years. The global rural population is now close to 3.4 billion and is expected to decline to 3.2 billion by 2050. Africa and Asia are home to nearly 90 per cent of the world’s rural population. India has the largest rural population (857 million), followed by China (635 million).

• The urban population of the world has grown rapidly since 1950, from 746 million to 3.9 billion in 2014. Asia, despite its lower level of urbanization, is home to 53 per cent of the world’s urban population, followed by Europe (14 per cent) and Latin America and the Caribbean (13 per cent).

• Continuing population growth and urbanization are projected to add 2.5 billion people to the world’s urban population by 2050, with nearly 90 per cent of the increase concentrated in Asia and Africa.

• Just three countries — India, China and Nigeria — together are expected to account for 37 per cent of the projected growth of the world’s urban population between 2014 and 2050. India is projected to add 404 million urban dwellers, China 292 million and Nigeria 212 million.

• Close to half of the world’s urban dwellers reside in relatively small settlements of less than 500,000 inhabitants, while only around one in eight live in the 28 mega-cities with more than 10 million inhabitants.

• Tokyo is the world’s largest city with an agglomeration of 38 million inhabitants, followed by Delhi with 25 million, Shanghai with 23 million, and Mexico City, Mumbai and São Paulo, each with around 21 million inhabitants. By 2030, the world is projected to have 41 mega-cities with more than 10 million inhabitants. Tokyo is projected to remain the world’s largest city in 2030 with 37 million inhabitants, followed closely by Delhi where the population is projected to rise swiftly to 36 million. Several decades ago most of the world’s largest urban agglomerations were found in the more developed regions, but today’s large cities are concentrated in the global South. The fastest-growing urban agglomerations are medium-sized cities and cities with less than 1 million inhabitants located in Asia and Africa.

• Some cities have experienced population decline in recent years. Most of these are located in the low-fertility countries of Asia and Europe where the overall population is stagnant or declining. Economic contraction and natural disasters have contributed to population losses in some cities as well.

• As the world continues to urbanize, sustainable development challenges will be increasingly concentrated in cities, particularly in the lower-middle-income countries where the pace of urbanization is fastest. Integrated policies to improve the lives of both urban and rural dwellers are needed.

See the report.

Publicado em Cidades Sustentáveis, Desenvolvimento, Desenvolvimento sustentável, Economia, Estudos ambientais, Sustainable Cities, Sustentabilidade | Marcado com , , , , | Deixe um comentário

United Nations: World Urbanization Prospects, the 2014 revision

United Nations 2014 Revision of World Urbanization Prospects

This web site contains data tables, figures, maps, analyses and technical notes from the 2014 Revision of the World Urbanization Prospects. These documents do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

Publicado em Cidades Sustentáveis, Comunidades, Desenvolvimento, Desenvolvimento sustentável, Economia, Estudos ambientais, Human activities and climate change, Sustainable Cities, Sustentabilidade | Marcado com , , , | Deixe um comentário

Cidades terão mais de 6 bilhões de habitantes em 2050, destaca novo relatório da ONU

Moradia, infraestrutura, transporte, energia e emprego são alguns dos desafios das megacidades, como Rio, São Paulo e Belo Horizonte. Na imagem, criança na Favela Sônia Ribeiro, conhecida como ‘favela do Piolho’, atingida por um incêndio em setembro de 2012. Foto: Marcelo Camargo/ABr

Moradia, infraestrutura, transporte, energia e emprego são alguns dos desafios das megacidades, como Rio, São Paulo e Belo Horizonte. Na imagem, criança na Favela Sônia Ribeiro, conhecida como ‘favela do Piolho’, atingida por um incêndio em setembro de 2012. Foto: Marcelo Camargo/ABr

Do site das Nações Unidas no Brasil

As próximas décadas trarão mudanças profundas no tamanho e distribuição das população global. A contínua urbanização e o crescimento geral da população fará com que 2,5 bilhões novas pessoas passem a viver em áreas urbanas em 2050, que abarcarão mais de 6 bilhões de habitantes dos 9,6 bilhões previstos para essa data.

São Paulo e Rio de Janeiro são citadas como megacidades e aparecem na lista das áreas urbanas mais povoadas do mundo, segundo o novo relatório “Perspectivas Globais de Urbanização” das Nações Unidas, lançado nesta quinta-feira (10).

Os continentes mais impactados por este rápido crescimento serão a África e a Ásia, onde se espera que 90% dessa nova população de 2,5 bilhões de habitantes residirá – mais especificamente na Índia, China e Nigéria, que contabilizarão 37% do crescimento mundial da população urbana entre 2014 e 2050.

Megacidades brasileiras

Produzido pela Divisão de População do Departamento de Assuntos Econômicos e Sociais das Nações Unidas (DESA), o relatório também destaca que de 1990 até 2014 as megacidades, com registro de população superior a 10 milhões, saltaram de 10 para 28, incluindo quatro na América Latina.

Entre elas se encontram a Grande São Paulo, com 20,8 milhões de residentes, e o Grande Rio, com 12,8 milhões de habitantes atualmente. Para 2050, o relatório estima que 79% da população brasileira viverá em centros urbanos.

São Paulo aparece na quinta posição de maiores aglomerações urbanas com mais de 5 milhões de habitantes, atrás apenas de Tóquio (Japão), com 37,8 milhões; Deli (Índia), com 24,9 milhões; Xangai (China), com 22,9 milhões; e Cidade do México (México) com 20,8 milhões. A lista também inclui Belo Horizonte na posição 59, com 5,6 milhões de residentes.

Crescimento em cidades pequenas em países em desenvolvimento

Com a população mundial urbana superando os 6 bilhões de habitantes, os países em desenvolvimento serão os mais impactados por este rápido crescimento. O documento informa que grande parte desse crescimento acontecerá em pequenos assentamentos humanos, que atualmente registram menos de 500 mil habitantes.

Os países africanos, onde grande parte dessa urbanização acontecerá, enfrentarão os maiores desafios para encontrar meios de atender as necessidades relacionadas com esse aumento populacional, incluindo moradia, infraestrutura, transporte, energia e emprego, assim como serviços básicos e educação.

“Administrar áreas urbanas se transformou num dos maiores desafios de desenvolvimento do século 21. Nosso sucesso ou fracasso para construir cidades sustentáveis será um fator relevante no sucesso da agenda de desenvolvimento da ONU pós-2015”, disse Johan Wilmoth, diretor da Divisão de População da DESA.

O relatório ressalta que uma agenda de planejamento urbana de sucesso precisará focar em assentamentos urbanos de todos os tamanhos. Se bem administrada, as cidades oferecem oportunidades importantes para o desenvolvimento econômico e para a expansão do acesso de serviços básicos.

Fornecer transporte público, assim como moradia, eletricidade, água e saneamento para uma população urbana densamente estabelecida é normalmente mais barato e prejudica menos o meio ambiente que fornecer um serviço similar em áreas rurais dispersas.

Esta revisão de 2014 do “Perspectivas Globais de Urbanização” traz informação nova e atualizada das tendências de urbanização globais e crescimento das cidades. Os dados são vitais para estabelecer prioridades políticas para promover um desenvolvimento inclusivo, equitativo e sustentável para as áreas urbanas e rurais.

Ao reconhecer a importância das cidades pequenas e municípios, essa última revisão expande a recopilação de cidades e fornece, pela primeira vez, uma estimativa e projeção populacional para todos os assentamentos urbanos do mundo com mais de 300 mil habitantes em 2014.

Acesse todos os dados disponíveis em http://esa.un.org/unpd/wup/.

Publicado em Cidades Sustentáveis, Comunidades, Consciência ambiental, Desenvolvimento, Desenvolvimento sustentável, Economia, Estudos ambientais, Sustainable Cities, Sustentabilidade | Marcado com , , , , , , , | Deixe um comentário

CDP Cities 2014: the most comprehensive climate change reporting platform at the city level

CDP Cities 2014: the most comprehensive climate change reporting platform at the city level

. CDP cities represent a growing slice of the world’s economy

. Cities are undertaking 2110 activities to mitigate and adapt to climate change

. From Rio to Boston, more and more cities are measuring their CO2 emissions

. Cities are facing risks from climate change

From CDP.net/infographics

Publicado em Aquecimento global, Cambio climático, Carbono, Cidades Sustentáveis, Clima, Climate Change, Conservação, Consumo, Desenvolvimento, Desenvolvimento sustentável, Economia, Economia Verde-Green Economy, Empresas, Estudos ambientais, Gases do Efeito Estufa, Gestão sustentável, Human activities and climate change, Impactos ambientais, Jornalismo Ambiental, Mudança climática, Objetivos de Desenvolvimento do Milênio, Publicações, Responsabilidade corporativa, Responsabilidade Social Empresarial RSE, Responsabilidade socioambiental, Rio de Janeiro, Seguro e Meio Ambiente, Seguro e sustentabilidade, Sustainable Cities, Sustentabilidade | Marcado com , , , , , , , | Deixe um comentário

CDP Cities 2014: 207 cities reporting worldwide, covering a population of 394,360,000

CDP Cities 2014: 207 cities reporting worldwide, covering a population of 394,360,000

Cities around the world, from Seattle to Shenzhen, have participated in the largest and most comprehensive survey of cities and climate change.

From CDP.net/infographics

Publicado em Aquecimento global, Cambio climático, Cidades Sustentáveis, Clima, Climate Change, Conservação, Consumo, Desenvolvimento sustentável, Economia, Economia Verde-Green Economy, Empresas, Gestão sustentável, Impactos ambientais, Objetivos de Desenvolvimento do Milênio, Responsabilidade corporativa, Responsabilidade social, Responsabilidade Social Empresarial RSE, Responsabilidade socioambiental, Seguro e Meio Ambiente, Seguro e sustentabilidade, Sustainable Cities, Sustentabilidade | Marcado com , , , | Deixe um comentário